Hypervisors and you!

Dan Egli ddavidegli at gmail.com
Sat Mar 30 00:45:10 MDT 2013


*On March 27, 2013 Michael Torrie wrote:*

* *

*> I was speaking of the user-mode emulation, though, not system emulation.*

* *

*That's something that I had not heard of. Interesting....*

* *

*> Hope that makes sense. It did require a partial install of a distro*

*> that could support the binary. On my yellow dog install, for example, I*

*> had libc, x11, gtk, etc... libraries from x86 installed.*

* *

*That's interesting. How did you differentiate them from the PPC libs? I
know most binaries look for the library by file name in each directory in
your library path (either from the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable, or
those directories specified in /etc/ld.so.conf) and load the first matching
filename. So how did your Qemu know to run say /lib-x86/libc.so instead of
/lib/libc.so? Did you have some kind of funky ld.so magic? Or was there a
Qemu parameter that specified a lib directory for those files?*

* *

*--- Dan*


On Wed, Mar 27, 2013 at 1:51 AM, Michael Torrie <torriem at gmail.com> wrote:

> On 03/26/2013 10:18 AM, Levi Pearson wrote:
> > I can't really speak to how much love it gets now vs then, but I do
> > know that quite a few arm cross-development frameworks use it for
> > testing/simulation work. You can write emulators for a lot of the
> > custom hardware on an embedded board or SoC into the Qemu binary and
> > then be able to boot an image with most of the same functionality on
> > either Qemu or the real board.  This is a great time-saver!  I think
> > the Android SDK device emulator is based on Qemu's ARM emulation as
> > well, and that's even more widely used.  So, I think it's fair to say
> > that at least the ARM emulation gets a fair bit of love these days.
>
> I was speaking of the user-mode emulation, though, not system emulation.
>  Usermode emulation used to be used a lot back in the day.  It would let
> you run a linux binary from, say, arm, on x86.  Or vice versa.  Arguably
> less useful now than it used to be, but if Arm-based linux laptops ever
> caught on it would be useful again.  This binary is run without booting
> up any operating system in a virtual machine.  No virtual disks either,
> as guest binaries had full access to the system just as a native binary
> did.
>
> Hope that makes sense.  It did require a partial install of a distro
> that could support the binary.  On my yellow dog install, for example, I
> had libc, X11, gtk, etc libraries from x86 installed.
>
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