Did Ed Snowden do the right thing?

Daniel C. dcrookston at gmail.com
Mon Jun 10 16:29:16 MDT 2013


On Mon, Jun 10, 2013 at 4:19 PM, Nathan England <nathan at nmecs.com> wrote:
> Your argument is similar to the typical:
>
> Can God, who can do anything, create a mountain so big that he couldn't climb it?

No, it's not.  My question (not argument) is about the source of right
and wrong.  Your example is a logical paradox.

> God, as the creator of right and wrong, will not willfully tell me to do something that
> he has said is wrong.

Not the point.  It's not about what God *would* do.  It's about
whether or not God commanding something is what causes that thing to
be right.

> Your entire argument is designed to frame a person into your argument so you can
> beat them. Did you learn this in philosophy class in college? Did your anti-god teacher
> teach you how to put a "christian" in his place?

You are assuming that my teacher was "anti-god."  My question (not
argument) is designed to clarify an ethical question, not to frame
people.

> God is perfect justice. God is perfect punishment (punishment fits the crime according
> to God, not man). God is perfect compassion. God is perfect hatred. And anything else
> I'm forgetting. God is complete. We base our ideas and perceptions on only knowing
> half the story yet convince ourselves we are wise.

Which doesn't really address the question.

> Making yourself a final authority (deciding for yourself what is right and wrong) is
> contrary to having a God in the first place.

Yet you believe that you know the mind of God, as demonstrated by your
earlier statement that you know that God wouldn't command you to do
something.  Either you reserve the right to decide what is right and
what is wrong (which you do earlier when you say that you know God
wouldn't command you to do X or Y) or you are subject to God's
commandments, even if they go against your better judgment.

-Dan


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