subject: Wine and Games under Linux

Todd Millecam tyggna at gmail.com
Thu Feb 21 08:29:47 MST 2013


On Thu, Feb 21, 2013 at 12:58 AM, DANIEL DAVID EGLI <ddavidegli at gmail.com>wrote:

> *I'm getting ready to go back to Linux after a long hiatus (don't ask, it's
> a long story that I REALLY don't want to get into!) and I have some
> questions that I'm hoping to get answered. Please bear with me if this is
> something that most of you already know. I assure I would not ask you if I
> had other avenues to get this information (again, don't ask. Please!).*
>
> *I have been hearing a lot lately about how Wine can supposedly run various
> Windows games. I admit it's been a few years since I looked at it, but
> doesn't stock Wine have a hard time on games? Especially
> non-DirectDraw/Direct3D games that don't use Windows' window management
> system? I know Wine is great for a lot of things, but unless the project
> has massively improved since I looked about 3-4 years ago, you needed a
> special port of Wine, like Cedega, to run most DirectX games and even that
> didn't handle non-DirectX games necessarily very well. How well would the
> latest sock version of Wine handle something like Spore, Oblivion, Diablo
> III, BioShock, Deus Ex (any of them) or Skyrim, or even a simple, non-DX
> game like one of the Virtual Villager games from Last Day at Work (ldw.com
> )?
> I'd really like to know. I have a LARGE amount of games I'd like to play
> under Linux once I get my Linux machine up and running, and I need to know
> what program(s) and/or libraries I'd need in addition to the standard
> install to play them. Most are DirectX based (primarily 3D, but a couple
> older 2D games also), with a few non-DX games (like the Virtual Villager
> games) added in to boot. Has anyone tried using the Windows version of
> Steam under any version of Wine? While it's true that Valve is porting
> their games to Linux and has released a Linux version of Steam it's also
> true that there are very few games that are currently available under
> Linux's Steam. So I would need to use Windows' Steam to get most of the
> games I want to play.*
>
> **
>
> It technically works, and it'll even install games.  However, you have to
do some exotic things to get most of them to work.  Mostly, you have to
install DirectX under wine, and then ensure that it's included in your wine
path.  Even this is kinda hit-or-miss.

> * *
>
> *Also, speaking of gaming, any one know how many monitors can be connected
> to a Linux machine running Nvidia's closed-source X driver and multiple
> video cards? I.e. if I have, say, two GeForce 670 based cards in SLI
> configuration, can I hook a monitor to each card, or, even better, hook up
> three monitors at once? I seem to recall older versions of the Nvidia
> driver supporting multiple monitors or SLI, but not both at once. Maybe
> that's wasn't the case, but I do wonder. I'm hoping to build a monster
> gaming box before too long, and would really prefer to be able to run
> multiple monitors under Linux.*
>
> * *
>
> Pretty much every monitor in the world.  Nvidia has really come a long way
in this area, and so has X for that matter.  Their proprietary driver works
fine with multiple cards and monitors on pretty much every distro.  They
even give you pretty much the same gui config utility you get in windows
now, but you can do a lot more fine-tweaking with the command line conf
tools still. The performance of their Linux driver compared to their
windows is kinda shotty.  While Linux caching and just, well, better
design, will almost absolutely give you better FPS for OpenGL games, any
kind of Cuda or OpenCL application will run much slower in Linux because
the proprietary driver for Linux isn't as well programmed.

Alternatively, there's an open-source driver available called nouveau.  It
provides fairly decent 2D and 3D acceleration on most cards, supports SLI,
but I'm not sure they've worked out all the kinks for the 600 GTX series
yet.  A lot of distros have switched to this for its default.  It's a lot
more stable, but a lot more buggy than the proprietary driver overall.

Hope that helps.

-- 
Todd Millecam


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