What's your favorite distro, and why?

Grant Shipley gshipley at gmail.com
Thu Dec 5 08:03:21 MST 2013


On Wed, Dec 4, 2013 at 11:59 PM, Dan Egli <ddavidegli at gmail.com> wrote:

> On Tuesday, December 3, 2013, Michael Torrie wrote:
>
> > These days if I was going to introduce Linux to a friend, I'd probably
>
> > put them on Linux Mint.
>
>
>
> Never heard of Mint before. What's good/bad about that one? :)
>
>
>
> That's the whole reason I started this thread, so I could learn about the
> less common distributions, and what makes them good or bad. :)
>

Mint is not a less common distribution.  It seems that mint and arch have
most of the mindshare for all the hipster hackers nowadays.

When people got mad at Canonical for their underhanded sharing of data with
amazon, a lot of people left that camp.  Granted, it also had a lot to do
with people generally hating Unity and finally realizing that canonical is
not a good open source citizen.

I find that Ubuntu is more in use by people who like linux but don't care
so much about running a completely free open source OS.  It's the same
reason we have a seen a mass exodus to OSX.  People understand the
technical merits of a linux/unix based system and prefer convenience over
philosophy.  Please don't mistake this comment as something bad, it isn't.
 People are and should be free to use whatever they want that suits their
personal desires and goals.  Just trying to explain what I have seen in the
linux space over the last 10-15 years.

--
gs

>
>
> --- Dan
>
>
> On Thu, Dec 5, 2013 at 12:29 PM, Dan Egli <ddavidegli at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > On December 3, 2013, John D Jones III wrote:
> >
> > > I'm a hardcore Arch Linux user, and have been for ~6 years now. I
> prefer
> > the rolling release structure, it's bleeding edge
> >
> > > yet stable. On the server end, FreeBSD 4 LYF!! I've been using it for
> > 12, up until I discovered Arch I ran fbsd on the
> >
> > I hear a lot about Arch. Perhaps some day I'll throw it on a virtual
> > machine and play around with it. It sounds like it has a lot to recommend
> > itself. I've never tried any *BSD, but perhaps one day I will investigate
> > them too. They just kind of leave a bad taste in my mouth, not being
> Linux
> > flavors. :)
> >
> >
> >
> > > And yes, I did try Gentoo, it's a fine distro, but I just got tired of
> > it's 'attitude' and I've
> >
> > > seen nothing recently that suggests the 'attitude' has changed.
> >
> >
> >
> > What attitude are you referring to, may I ask? I'm lost on this. :)
> >
> >
> >
> > --- Dan
> >
> >
> > On Thu, Dec 5, 2013 at 12:28 PM, Dan Egli <ddavidegli at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> On December 3, 2013, Michael Torrie wrote:
> >>
> >> > I used Maildir-formatted e-mail back with a Fedora Core 1 box. I never
> >>
> >> > had the dependency problems you state. Also, I don't believe
> >> courier-imap
> >>
> >> > ever was a Fedora standard package, so you can't blame Fedora for your
> >>
> >> > dependency issues. I was probably using an early version of Dovecot,
> or
> >>
> >> > maybe I just built courier myself..
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Well, I know I didn't build courier myself. I know I used an RPM. I'm
> >> fairly sure I used apt-get to install it from the standard FC2 repos,
> but I
> >> could be wrong (and I know apt-get is usually debian based, I had apt
> for
> >> rpm installed because this was an older box that took for frigging EVER
> to
> >> run yum, where as apt ran just fine). Either way, I did specifically
> state
> >> that this was back in the days of FC2, so a lot could have changed
> between
> >> then and now. :)
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> > That said, none of the dependencies you mention are really a problem,
> >>
> >> > nor really a waste. Despite your implication you're not really
> >>
> >> > installing all those database systems. Rather you're just installing
> >>
> >> > very small shared libraries for potentially accessing those database
> >>
> >> > systems (IE the API is the only thing installed. And the cost of
> >>
> >> > breaking all those small library dependencies out into separate
> packages
> >>
> >> > is just too high. You don't want to have to have a full and complete
> >>
> >> > but different version of courier-imap for each permutation of software
> >>
> >> > combination! I know that goes against your gentoo sensibilities! :)
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> I'm quite familiar with the differences between say, openldap-<version>
> >> and openldap-libs-<version> and you're right that many were just the
> libs.
> >> But if my memory is correct (I could be wrong!) openldap wasn't just the
> >> -libs package required. Perhaps there wasn't a -libs package available
> to
> >> whoever designed the RPM (whether it was designed by the Fedora
> maintainers
> >> or someone else), but my memory says I had to install openldap itself
> (the
> >> full package) to get courier's RPM happy. And the point wasn't having
> all
> >> these DMBS packages installed, but the fact that this was a very small
> hard
> >> disk drive (< 4GB HDD if I recall, this WAS more than 12 years ago) so I
> >> had to REALLY prioritize what went on there, since it was a combo
> system to
> >> be my home e-mail server plus my print/file server, plus the samba
> server,
> >> plus the internet gateway. Those packages, just the libs and what ever
> else
> >> was required, used a large chunk of my HDD that I could have used for
> other
> >> purposes.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> And I'm also familiar with building RPMs on systems like Fedora. I have
> >> personally designed custom RPMs for programs like exim because I wanted
> to
> >> get just the right feature set. I can't say I've ever used git, but
> doing
> >> configure/make/make install is something I've done quite a few times.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> I do understand your point about trying to install things straight from
> >> tarballs though. Certainly doable on a few packages or only a couple
> >> servers. But not on a large setup. That's partially (_I_ think) why
> "Roll
> >> your own Linux" never really got too popular. :) Imagine downloading and
> >> compiling EVERYTHING from scratch, including glibc and gcc and init (or
> >> Systemd in more modern systems). Doable? Oh, absolutely. Doable on a
> large
> >> scale? Not so much.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --- Dan
> >>
> >>
> >> On Thu, Dec 5, 2013 at 12:26 PM, Dan Egli <ddavidegli at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>> On December 3, 2013, Levi Pearson wrote:
> >>>
> >>> > If I was going to spend a bunch of time installing and learning a new
> >>>
> >>> > distro, I'd try out NixOS (http://nixos.org/) which has my favorite
> >>>
> >>> > concept of all the distributions. It treats package managment and
> >>>
> >>> > configuration as part of the same system,
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> That sounds rather bizzare to me. But maybe I'm misunderstanding you on
> >>> that. I'll look over the site a bit, but perhaps you can explain
> better how
> >>> this package managment and configuration works combined?
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Out of curosity, if it's a distribution of Linux, why are they calling
> >>> it something else (NixOS vs. Nix Linux)? Or, is it not so much Linux
> as a
> >>> *NIX O/S? That's what I'd guess from the name, but I could be wrong.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --- Dan
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On Thu, Dec 5, 2013 at 5:48 AM, Michael Torrie <torriem at gmail.com
> >wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> On 12/03/2013 11:10 AM, Lonnie Olson wrote:
> >>>> > * Mint
> >>>> > - Ugly, old, backwards UI choices
> >>>>
> >>>> Sounds like a plus in my book.  Although Mint may be the distro
> >>>> developing Cinnamon and Mate, the big distros now support them both
> out
> >>>> of the box. Fedora for sure has them both.
> >>>>
> >>>> Despite the age of the core technologies, Mate+Compiz work best for
> me.
> >>>>  And Mate can live alongside Gnome 3 and Cinnamon, so I'm not giving
> up
> >>>> anything. I still use some Gnome 3 apps.
> >>>>
> >>>> Cinnamon is okay, but I like the customizations I have made in Compiz,
> >>>> and I have to have a pager that shows at least window outlines like
> >>>> Mate/Gnome2 does.  I've tried to put in a feature request to Cinnamon
> >>>> for the pager thing, but they didn't seem to understand just what I
> was
> >>>> getting at.  Ahh well.  If anyone knows an extension that can give me
> >>>> this feature, I would very much like to know about it.
> >>>>
> >>>> /*
> >>>> PLUG: http://plug.org, #utah on irc.freenode.net
> >>>> Unsubscribe: http://plug.org/mailman/options/plug
> >>>> Don't fear the penguin.
> >>>> */
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
>
> /*
> PLUG: http://plug.org, #utah on irc.freenode.net
> Unsubscribe: http://plug.org/mailman/options/plug
> Don't fear the penguin.
> */
>


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