Webdev: the times, they are a changin'

Bryan Petty etierra at gmail.com
Tue Apr 17 02:21:14 MDT 2012


On Mon, Apr 16, 2012 at 8:40 PM, Tod Hansmann <plug.org at todandlorna.com> wrote:
> Preface: I did the whole raw html files, maybe w/javascript back in the
> mid-90's.  I did CGI with C.  I did PHP since PHP3 came out.

This pretty much sums up how I started in web dev too.

> The problem: Web dev sucks.  PHP is still, well, PHP.

http://me.veekun.com/blog/2012/04/09/php-a-fractal-of-bad-design/

Nothing more needs to be said.

> Python:  Django and Pylons are both overcomplicated and constantly
> changing.
>
> Ruby:  I realize this is a personal thing, but I hate Ruby.  Regardless,
> Rails is no saner than django, and its performance is still terrible,
> even if I didn't hate Ruby.  A friend of mine like Sinatra, but agrees
> that the Ruby side too suffers from changing way too much for our tastes
> between versions.

Just because something changes frequently doesn't necessarily make it
a bad thing. Python and Ruby (more specifically, the web frameworks
designed for these languages) are just a few of many actually
attempting to keep up with the latest web development concepts that
are being adopted like wild fire (HTML5, AJAX, a bucket full of
Javascript libraries, NoSQL databases, asset
minification/compression/caching and distribution, message queues,
background workers... need I go on?), and a lot of that is going to
involved massive changes around the design of web applications taking
advantage of those concepts and libraries. The languages themselves
are pretty solid.

PHP would be doing the same thing except that its just so widely
adopted and so fragile, that it's stuck where it is, and it *can't* be
changed. You might notice that this is really the case with the Zend
Framework too, other PHP web frameworks like CakePHP and CodeIgniter
have made huge strides in using more modern web application design
(but still deeply flawed in that they are built on PHP of course)
where Zend has failed miserably, but only because they are still
fairly new, and aren't required to maintain a high level of
compatibility.

Embrace the change, unless you just like making ironic complaints
about wanting something new and different.

Regards,
Bryan Petty


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