DSLR Opinions

Joshua Fenio std3rr at gmail.com
Sat Jun 11 07:39:59 MDT 2011


On Fri, Jun 10, 2011 at 6:13 PM, Tod Hansmann <plug.org at todandlorna.com>
 wrote:

> Anyone have any up-to-the-moment opinions on any digital SLR cameras?
> Looking to get something that I can do some nice photos and possibly HD
> video here and there.


I've owned the D40, the D90, and currently, the D7000.  All of which are
Nikon - but you can't go wrong with either Canon or Nikon.  Questions to ask
yourself when deciding between the two brands are:

What do my friends use?  (so you can borrow lenses and the like)
What type of pictures do I want to take?  (I'd argue that the D7000's low
light performance is better than anything else in its price range -
conversely, Canon's a perennial favorite in the portrait crowd - Canon
strobes tend to be cheaper and more varied)

Honestly, body isn't nearly as important as the lenses you buy.  I'd
probably recommend the D90, but that's because I'm a huge fan of Nikon.  You
can't really go wrong with the T1i, either (although I'd probably argue that
the D90 is the 'better' camera ;-)).

I'm no professional, just an amateur who has fun, but here are a couple
photos I've taken with my Nikons.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dataw0lf/5693603364/in/photostream - photo of
my stepdaughter at ISO 2500, highlighting the D7000's superb performance in
such conditions.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dataw0lf/5467278620/in/photostream - Another
D7000 shot, shot in Provo Canyon.  This is using a Tokina 12-24mm wide angle
lens.  I'd argue that Nikon's wide angles are far superior to Canon's (Canon
does have them beat in the telephoto area though).


http://www.flickr.com/photos/dataw0lf/4980927334/in/photostream - D90 shot,
with a 70-200mm f2.8.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dataw0lf/4746702012/in/photostream - D90 with
the Tokina wide angle lens, backcountrying in the Tetons.


2011/6/10 Jason Hall <jayce at lug-nut.com>

>
> Go for the Rebel, or I forget the line on Nikon that compares, and
> then spend some money on some better lenses than come in the kit.
>

The D3100, probably.  Never used it, but I'm sure it's a fine camera.  The
problem with cheaper Nikons (I had this problem with my D40), and this
problem extends to the D3100, is that they have no in-body focus motor.
 This means that you can't use older lenses, because older lenses don't have
a motor builtin to them.  You can tell the lenses that're compatible with
these cheaper Nikon bodies by the "AF-S" designation they have.  Most new
lenses do have this designation, so you aren't too limited, but if you're
like me and have a Dad who has 50+ year old lenses that you want to give a
shot, it can be a surprise.


On Fri, Jun 10, 2011 at 9:47 PM, Jonathan Duncan <
jonathan at bluesunhosting.com> wrote:

>
> It really all comes down to how much you want to spend and what you want
> the camera to do.  Here is some suggested reading.  Some people do not like
> Ken Rockwell and consider him biased, but I enjoy the information and
> perspective he provides.
>
> http://www.kenrockwell.com/index.htm
> http://www.digitalreview.ca/


Ken Rockwell has some interesting tidbits, but I vastly prefer Thom Hogan
for Nikon related stuff, and DP Review which has probably the most thorough
camera and lens reviews on the internet.

http://bythom.com/
http://www.dpreview.com/

At any rate, coming from the Nikon world, I'd suggest you buy a used D90
(don't bother with the kit lens), and purchase a 50mm f1.8 (~100 bucks,
known in the Canon and Nikon worlds as "nifty fiftys"), and another lens
dependent upon your interests (landscape / architecture - Sigma 10-20mm or
Tokian 12-24mm, wildlife / sports - 18-200mm f2.8).

- JF


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