January Meeting Reminder

Levi Pearson levi at cold.org
Wed Jan 2 14:23:34 MST 2008


Steve <smorrey at gmail.com> writes:

> Um not to correct you Levi, but the world is full of VRML and Java Applets.
> Well of a sort anyways.  Second Life is absolutely HUGE and has
> essentially become the standard online 3D world that VRML strove to
> be.  In fact it's so common right now, that even IBM uses it for
> business meetings.
> And Java, well Java is everywhere too, just not where you'ld think.
> Sure it's not the de-facto standard for web-apps since flash has that
> honor.  But a cursory glance at the Java jobs section of any
> recruiting site shows that Java is in big demand, therefore there must
> be a pretty good call for it.

I'm glad you weren't trying to correct me, since you didn't.  I'm well
aware of Second Life, though I think its usage statistics have been
grossly overblown and it's not at all the sort of thing that the web
and VRML are.  Croquet is more like the idea behind VRML, but at this
point, both Second Life and Croquet are niche technologies and VRML is
forgotten.  

You'll notice I didn't say 'Java applications', I said 'Java applets'.
About the only people who write Java applets anymore for consumption
on the web are college professors (or their grad students, usually).
I've nothing in particular against Java, but has been 'strategically
repurposed' a few times since its inception.

Anyway, I'm sure the ideas of 3d computing environments,
network-delivered applications, and socially-oriented sites will never
completely disappear.  I don't think that any of the current players
will achieve lasting success in their spheres, though.  And I find the
hype over 'make money with our new Social Networking technologies!'
stuff to be particularly abhorrent, so I hope it gets displaced
quickly.

Back in the real days of the Internet, you did your socializing on
Usenet, you visited virtual worlds via MUDs, and if you wanted to use
an application you downloaded it via ftp and compiled and ran it.  All
this commercialization has made it way more glitzy, but not a lot more
interesting.  Bah!  I wish you kids would get off my lawn!

                --Levi



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