Database Design Theory?

Matthew Ross Walker matt at thebraingarden.com
Thu Nov 10 10:40:04 MST 2005


Sasha Pachev wrote:
> Matthew:
> 
> My first suggestion is to relax. 

Heh. Relaxing is /not/ one of my problems. :) Unless you count being too
relaxed as a problem. >.>

> Second is to remember that theory
> exists to serve the practice, not the other way around. With that in
> mind, when designing databases, do not think third normal form,
> referential integrity, stored procedures, objects, managers, managers
> talking to objects, objects sending messages to managers, and all other
> things that people like to draw in diagrams during meetings to
> demonstrate they know something.
> 
> Instead, think current and possible future requirements of the
> application, ease of development, ease of maintenance, CPU, RAM, disk
> I/O, and common sense in general. If a trigger, stored procedure, or a
> foreign key look like they are going to help, use them. If you do not
> know much about them, do not worry. If you ever hit a point where you
> really need them, your intuition will guide you to the right place of
> the manual at the right time, and you will learn the matter quickly.

I agree fully. But I like to have at least a basic knowledge of how
things work, to give my intuition some guidance. Plus, learning things
is fun, and the more I know, the more things I find out there are to
learn. I'm still trying to find a good project to use my basic Lisp
knowledge on, but if I don't find one, oh well. Someday it'll come it
useful.

Thanks to all the other people who replied to this thread. Sorry I
haven't been responding. Had a very busy couple days, since we're
switching hosting companies for our major back-end systems, and I've
been in meetings with the new dev team, talking about our requirements,
and what we can expect from them.

-- 
Matthew Walker
The Brain Garden, Inc
matt at thebraingarden.com
Work: (801) 655-1075
Home: (801) 491-2079
Page: (801) 283-9887 (Emergencies Only)

Random Quote:
There ain't nothin' in this world that's worth being a snot over.
             -- Larry Wall in <1992Aug19.041614.6963 at netlabs.com>
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